SC State Capital Revolutionary War Painting

Kershaw

~ SC State Capital Revolutionary War Painting ~
This battle (1775 - 1783) was initiated by "
delegates" from the 13 colonies

(MA, NH, CT, RI, DE, NY, NJ, PA, VA, MD, NC, SC, GA)
in "congress" against Great Britain over the objection to Parliament's
Taxation policies and lack of Colonial Representation.

1785 1792.gif

[Kershaw] where more than a dozen fierce Revolutionary War battles raged approximately two centuries ago. In 1732, English traders and farmers moved to the area from the Charleston coast...considered the oldest inland city (Camden) in the state.  The county (Kershaw) was created in 1791 from parts ofClaremont, Lancaster, Fairfield, and Richland counties.

Joseph Kershaw
Kershaw 1800 Slave Owners.png
SC Election Districts Map #6

Reminder - in 1800, the South Carolina General Assembly abandoned the term "county" and all existing and new counties would be identified as "districts," combining judicial districts with election districts. The term district, in lieu of county, continued in South Carolina until after the Civil War.

During 1800, the Liberty District was renamed to the Marion District.

 

The Charleston District (equivalent to a county) was established, but it was not considered to be an "election district." Instead, seven (7) of the existing parishes, as shown above, continued as election districts to represent Charleston District.

 

The Colleton District (equivalent to a county) was also established, but it too was not considered to be an "election district." Instead, four (4) of the existing parishes, as shown above, continued as election districts to represent Colleton District.

 

The Beaufort District (equivalent to a county) was also established, but it too was not considered to be an "election district." Instead, three (3) of the existing parishes, as shown above, continued as election districts to represent Beaufort District.

 

The Orangeburg District (equivalent to a county) was also established, but it too was not considered to an "election district." Instead, three (3) of the existing parishes and districts, as shown above, continued as election districts to represent Orangeburg District.

 

The Sumter District (equivalent to a county) was also established, but it too was not considered to be an "election district." Instead, two (2) of the existing districts, as shown above, continued as election districts to represent Sumter District. Interestingly, Claremont County and Clarendon County were both abandoned (as were all counties), but they retained their "election district" status for years to come.

 

The South Carolina General Assembly also created Barnwell District and Orangeburg District (equivalent to counties) in 1800, but they did not change the names of the existing election districts at this point in time.

SC Election District Map #10

In 1855, the South Carolina General Assembly resurrected the old Clarendon District (was a county in 1785 to 1800) as the equivalent to all other counties (still called districts), and it retained its "election district" status, and it was no longer considered to be a subset of the Sumter District.

 

Sumter District was now comprised only of the Claremont "election district." In 1856, the District Seat of Sumter District was moved from Statesburg to a new town, aptly named Sumter Court House.

 

The old overarching Pendleton District was now only considered in the SC Senate, with a single Senator representing this district. The Anderson District and Pickens District were now their own "election districts" with their allocated delegates representing each district in the SC House of Representatives.

Isrial Bracey
Christopher Columbus Bracey
Christopher Columbus & Thelma Bracey
Columbus Bracey